Thessaloniki Walking Tours

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|  Welcome To Thessaloniki Walking Tours
Email: info@thessalonikiwalkingtours.com
Contact us: +30 6978186900-1
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Evi Karkiti

Evi Karkiti

I can’t say exactly when, but it’s been some…

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I can’t say exactly when, but it’s been some time since I stopped driving in the city; a while later I also limited my use of public transportation, except when it was absolutely necessary. To manage that, I cut back on the time I used to spend on other obligations, in order to walk around in Thessaloniki, the city where I was born and raised, where I live until today. As I was walking the city, I developed a new connection with it, I met its people again, I heard their stories. That gave me the idea of a group of walkers who could take along with them, in well planned and organized tours, both the visitors of the city who wish to know it better and also those inhabitants who have the same desire. I approached some dear friends who have the same interests and in a short while the team of Thessaloniki Walking Tours was ready.

I am Evi and I have been working for more than 20 years as a journalist, a job I love a lot. And yet, the experience of Thessaloniki Walking Tours is the most exciting thing I have done until now.

Kostis Zafeirakis

Kostis Zafeirakis

If somebody claims that they know the city…

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If somebody claims that they know the city intimately, without having worn out a couple of pairs of shoes walking in it, you shouldn’t put too much trust in them. Life means walking ‘till the soles of your feet fall off. In other matters, I am savvatogenimenos (born-on-a-Saturday), a vegetarian and a wanderer. I ‘ve been climbing the Meteora, canyoning in Evritania, rafting in Aoos river. I have seen the lagoon of Missolonghi from above while flying a glider and I have met amazing people, full of cheer about the future. My travel shows (Exodus, Oxygono, I Love Gr) in ET3 and SKAI are a constant feast. I have logged countless hours of flight on the airwaves too: from the radio station 88.5 of Mylos and the irreverent news reports in Palmos 9.65 and later as a journalist and a musical producer. I will always remember “Thermometro”, an ahead-of-its-time special section we used to make for the newspaper Thessaloniki. I am writing stories about people, places and travels in www.parallaximag.gr. And I walk with Emo, my travelling dog, who is the personification of love and curiosity.
Alkistis Charsouli

Alkistis Charsouli

I was born in Thessaloniki. I left when I was…

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I was born in Thessaloniki. I left when I was young but soon enough my studies in archeology and my deep interest for the countless stories that people are willing to share urged me back.Thessaloniki has a thousand different faces; I seized the opportunity to embrace most of them.Even today I keep wandering the city’s neighborhoods looking for their untold secrets, listening to their revealing sounds, getting dizzy with their scents and flavors, suffering through their misfortunes.Impulsive wanderer to my very core, I love every little surprise that lies in wait for me and I get intrigued by any story that may seem rather trivial to a historian, but truly valuable to a citizen of the world.
George Featham

George Featham

I was born in Crete and grew up in …

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I was born in Crete and grew up in Rethymnon, a town with the sea to itsnorth and ever since 2002 I have been living in Thessaloniki, a city with the sea to itssouth. This means that I have trouble finding my orientation in Thessaloniki, and it always takes me a while to figure out which way is west or east during the tours. Disorientation is facilitated by the city itself, which has been “oscillating” for centuries between the East and the West.
A city of paradoxes where the equestrian statue of a king stands in Republic Square, souvlakis (sic) are called sandwiches, the logo of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki depicts the head of St. Demetrius (or St. Nestor) and many more that one will notice during a stroll downtown.
I studied History and Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and continued my studies in Art History. At the same time I attended a fast track course for tourist guides organised by the AUTH Department of Museology.I have been doing guided tours since 2014 mainly in the historic centre of Thessaloniki.
When not trying desperately to finish my PhD thesis on the personification of Death in Art, I do thematicwalking tours related to the death of antiquity and the birth of the middle ages, the death of the devotional image and the birth of facebook, the death of the old Thessaloniki and its modern day teratogenesis. I also do guided tours of the main public squares of the city and its cemeteries.
In my spare time I watch TV series, spend time with my terrapins and visit the Rotunda.
I hope to see you in one of our tours. However, I suggest youavoid asking me about Boniface of Montferrat, because I tend to talk about him endlessly, or where is theWest and where the Eastin this city.
Chryssa Chouveroudi

Chryssa Chouveroudi

Being charmed by history and by…

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Being charmed by history and by human creativity from childhood, it was more than expected to follow similar studies. From the field of archaeology to that of art history and through teaching to the art of architecture, I find myself searching for the real meaning of art making. The truth is that I see myself more as a student than a tutor, despite the fact that I’ve taught for many years in public and private colleges. In fact mostly through teaching and academic research I’ ve discovered the importance of Thessaloniki, its vital historic role and its architectural variety.
The city which has been for a long time a significant metropolis, at times it flourished and at others it was looted by different nations. The trauma and the glory are written in the city’s valuable text, narrating History with capital H and at the same time the stories of ordinary people. All these are weaved in a mysterious and sometimes less apocalyptical way that needs a thoughtfull approach to the city’s inner character. This is the reason why I decided to follow a special course in tour guiding at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.
This walking city opens its sea-embrace inviting visitors to discover the obvious and hidden history through relics and edifices from different times and civilizations. Speaking for myself I find it quite ecxhiting to share with people of different origin, age, culture, not only historical and culural facts but also the memory of the city and its authentic genious loci. I am looking forward to share with everyone who loves or is eager to know Thessaloniki the experience of reading through walking its unfolding, unwritten, unexpected identity.
Tasos Papadopoulos

Tasos Papadopoulos

My name is Tassos Papadopoulos. I was born in Thessaloniki and …

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My name is Tassos Papadopoulos. I was born in Thessaloniki and I walk in this city as far as I can remember myself. It is a great pleasure for me to be a PhD candidate in Byzantine Archaeology in an urban center that its byzantine churches are classified as world heritage monuments by the Unesco. But Thessaloniki has a lot more to offer…Every monument, street, building and sculpture carries its own microhistory. The history of people who passed through here and left their marks in the city’s collective memory. But this history acquires its own substance and uniqueness when it is shared with other people and this is precisely my intention.
From Galerius to Sabbatai Zevi and from Cassander to Murat, our city gives us the advantage to make leaps in history and to bridge cultures and traditions with unexpected ease, creating the cultural amalgam of Thessaloniki, a sea nymph with many faces.
However, well hidden behind Roman emperors and the great byzantine churches, the dark memory of the city is still lurking. The social history of Salonica, the unknown aspects, the songs of Rembetiko and the refugees, all the untold stories that I am trying to retrieve from the body of the city.
Come walk the city with us and experience the visible and invisible Thessaloniki. Hear the stories that are hiding behind the major monuments and meet the ghosts that haunt their past. They are not scary … They just want to share their stories, and these stories are here before us … in the narrow cobbled streets of the upper city, upon the worn Roman sculptures, on the domes of the Ottoman bathhouses, in the cracks of the Byzantine walls, in the handrails of the staircases at the Depot, in the ashes that the great fire of 1917 left behind.